Posts tagged with
"performance"

JavaScript growth and third parties

JavaScript is the main cause for making websites slow. Ten years ago it was network bottlenecks, but the growth of JavaScript has outpaced network and CPU improvements on today's devices. In the chart below, based on an analysis from the HTTP Archive, we see the number of requests has increased for both first and third party JavaScript since 2011.

JS Requests

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Performance improvement checklist for your whole site

One of the longest-standing items on my performance monitoring tool wishlist is an automatically-generated performance improvement checklist, with the improvements ordered by the impact that they will have on the website. In a previous life, I spent countless hours writing performance reports and conducting A/B performance tests to figure out which change would have the biggest impact on a website's performance.

So I'm understandably very excited that today we're announcing the new Improve dashboard – a prioritised performance improvement checklist that aggregates Lighthouse and Google PageSpeed results across all the URLs in your site to identify the most impactful performance changes you can make.

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Monitor performance budgets at a glance with your Status dashboard

This may sound counter-intuitive, but we don't want you to spend countless hours using SpeedCurve. In fact, our goal is to make your web performance data so accessible, understandable, and actionable that you can get everything you need from us in just a few minutes.

That's why we're so excited to announce the brand-new Status dashboard – a visualization that lets you see at a glance all your web performance budgets, as well as which budgets have been violated.

Keep reading to find out how to start using your Status dashboard to diagnose and fix your performance pains. But first, let's talk about why we built this feature.

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Weekly email reports from your SpeedCurve dashboards

Part of building a strong performance culture in an organisation is lowering the barrier to getting people excited about performance. One of the most effective ways I've found to do this is to send around a performance report every week that can, at a glance, answer an important question: did performance get better or worse?

That was the motivation behind our new Weekly Report feature. Now you can configure any of your Favorites dashboards to be summarized in a weekly email, like this one:

Weekly report email screenshot

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Introducing Last Painted Hero

We're excited to announce that we've launched Last Painted Hero as an official metric. Last Painted Hero is a synthetic metric that shows you when the last piece of critical content is painted. Keep reading to learn how Last Painted Hero works, why (and how) we created it, and how it can help you understand how your users perceive the speed of your pages.

The case for smarter heuristics

When choosing the right performance metric, my soapbox for the last few years has been "not every pixel has the same value". In other words, rather than chase dozens of different performance metrics, focus on the metrics that measure what's critical in your page.

Here at SpeedCurve, we think it's good to focus on rendering metrics, because they're a closer approximation to what the user experiences. There are some good rendering metrics out there, like start render and Speed Index, but the downside to these metrics is that they give every pixel the same value. For example, if the background renders and some ads render, that could improve your start render time and Speed Index score, but it might not have a big impact on the user's experience. Instead, it's better to measure the parts of the page that matter the most to users. We call those parts of the page the "hero elements".

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SpeedCurve Consulting Services with Tim Kadlec

We're excited to announce that SpeedCurve is partnering with Tim Kadlec to provide consulting services to our customers!

Tim is a recognized expert when it comes to web performance. He has spoken at numerous conferences including Velocity, Fluent, QCon, SmashingConf, Beyond Tellerand, and WebStock. He wrote High Performance Images and Implementing Responsive Design, as well as contributing to other books. Mark, Tammy and I have each collaborated with Tim on side projects. We're full of gleeful anticipation as we look forward to this opportunity to work together again.

In the first sentence I mentioned that this is a partnership. Here's what that means: Tim will continue to do consulting outside of SpeedCurve, and if you're not a SpeedCurve customer we encourage you to contact him directly. Tim will also be running SpeedCurve's consulting services. This partnership brings special advantages to SpeedCurve customers:

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How to create a healthy, happy performance culture

One of the best parts of my job is getting to talk to so many people from so many different companies about web performance. Every company is different, and I learn a ton from talking to each one. But one question that almost every person asks me – regardless of what industry they're in or the size of their organization – is this:

How can I create a stronger culture of web performance at my company?

Creating a performance culture means creating a feedback loop in your company or team that looks like this:

Culture Feedback Loop

In other words: Get people to care, show them what they can do to help, and then give them positive reinforcement when you get results. It's basic human psychology, and it might seem obvious when you see it in a super-simple graphic. But it's surprisingly easy to miss these steps and instead skip ahead to the part where you invest in awesome performance tools, and then wonder why all your performance efforts feel like such a painful uphill slog.

In this post, I'm going to share some proven tips and best practices to help you create a healthy, happy, celebratory performance culture. 

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Keeping track of performance changes

Being able to track which changes have an impact – either positive or negative – on your site’s performance is an important part of performance monitoring that can provide valuable feedback to your team. We wanted to make it easier to see at a glance all the changes to your site, without the cognitive overhead of interpreting charts. That’s why we created the new Changes dashboard, which gives you a newsfeed-style overview of recent activity in your SpeedCurve account.

Your Changes dashboard shows your performance budget alerts, deploys, site notes, and SpeedCurve product updates:

Changes dashboard (overview)

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Find and fix what matters most

Being able to monitor and measure the performance of your pages is crucial. You know that already. You also know that the next step is to quickly find out what’s hurting your pages so you can stop the pain.

You want to know:

  • Which performance rules is my page breaking?
  • How do I prioritize my optimization efforts?
  • How can I communicate this quickly and clearly to my team?

We’re super excited to announce that you can now use SpeedCurve to answer these questions.

Performance Recommendations

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SpeedCurve RUM: LUX

We're excited to announce SpeedCurve's RUM product, LUX.

The name LUX is a play on "Live User eXperience" and reflects how we've taken a different approach compared to other Real User Monitoring products. SpeedCurve's mission is to help designers and developers create joyous, fast user experiences. To do that, we focus on metrics that do a better job of revealing what the user's experience is really like. 

In addition to standard RUM metrics like page load time and total size, LUX includes innovative new metrics that have more to do with the user experience like start render time, number of critical blocking resources, images above the fold, and viewport size. LUX's RUM metrics help you figure out which design and development improvements will make your users happier and your business more successful.

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Track down front-end CPU hogs

Often when monitoring and debugging site performance we focus on network activity and individual resources, but what about the CPU? As more and more sites switch to using large Javascript frameworks and manipulating the page using Javascript, the execution time this code takes and the available CPU can instead become the performance bottleneck.

CPU usage for all Chrome tests

For any of SpeedCurve's Chrome-based tests, including emulated devices, we capture the Chrome Dev Tools timeline. From the browser main thread usage in the timeline we extract how busy the CPU is and what it's spending time on. Is it busy executing Javascript functions or busy laying out elements and painting pixels?

We also measure the CPU usage to different key events in the rendering of the page. SpeedCurve's focus is on the user experience and getting content in front of people as fast as possible, so we show you what the CPU is doing up till the page starts to render. This reflects CPU usage during the browser critical rendering path and can highlight various issues. If there's lots of CPU idle time then you're not delivering your resources efficiently. You want to get the CPU busy nice and early rendering the page, rather than sitting idle waiting for slow resources.

In the test below we see in the first pie chart that the CPU is spending a lot of time on layout up to the start render event, which is quite a different picture from the Fully Loaded CPU usage.  

CPU pie charts

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Performance budgets in action

Performance budgets are an important tool for ensuring your site is delivering a great user experience. Steve first experienced performance budgets while Head Performance Engineer at Google. The practice of using budgets to track performance took off with Tim Kadlec's blog post Setting a Performance Budget. The idea is to identify your performance goals and track the metrics that help you achieve your goals.

At SpeedCurve, we give performance budgets first-class status by tracking them in the Site dashboard. Here's an example of tracking a budget for image size.

Image performance budgets

Before setting your performance budgets, you first have to be monitoring your user experience. Only then can you set budgets and thresholds for improving your baseline user experience. This also allows you to quantify the improvements you're making and share success stories across the organization like "We just improved start render by 32% by reducing image requests to half the budgeted amount".

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